Thursday, February 19, 2009

WTF???


I'll be the first to admit that I don't follow cycling news religiously so I was not hip to Shimano's latest silliness, electronic shifting, til my mother-in-law sent me this article from the NY Times. Well low and behold, electronic shifting is now a reality and it will add around $1250 to the cost of a bike. So, let me get this straight...there are actually people out there who are willing to part with over a grand for the privilege of not being able to shift when their battery runs out? What I want to know is who buys this s***?? Yeah, I ride a fixed gear conversion, don't own any lycra or cycling shoes and maybe I might have Luddite tendencies but putting stuff normal people don't need on the market just fuels the whole consumerist thing and doesn't do a damn bit of good for cycling in general. End of rant.

4 comments:

Aileni said...

What crap. Negates the whole ethos of cycling.

Matthew said...

These are for only those who demand the quickest shifts possible, with as little down time as possible a.k.a. professional riders. Any "normal" person who puts this in their bike is just a fool with too much money, but there are professional cyclists that use these electronic shifters because they aren't racing for the "ethos of cycling", they are racing for the finish line and the pay check that waits there.

Kevin said...

I'm not understanding your complaint. Doesn't your own biased moralizing compromise the same high-minded cycling ideal of which you seem to be possessed? Or have you forgotten that the very industry that has now provided a surplus of lugged steel frames for fixed-gear conversions was driven forward and created that very surplus by advancing its own technological desires? Call it silly and call it needless, but don't moralize half-heartedly; the consumer excess of today becomes the fuel for the recycled/repurposed movement of tomorrow.

Anonymous said...

just think what the daily's must have been saying in the 1930's when the first cable actuated derailluer was introduced and you no longer needed to disengage your wheel while riding to change gears. No doubt this technology spurred outrage amongst the purists.